Wearable Learning Cloud Platform

Cloud-based education technology for engaging students and teachers in math learning through game design and embodied math game play

Wearable Learning Cloud Platform process

Collaboration in the Classroom


Wearable Learning Cloud Platform aims to improve student education through embodied learning and programmatic thinking. Through our platform, students and teachers can both design and play fun interactive games that incorporate math, technology and physical activity.

Game Creation


Program interactive games with a simple visual programming language. Games can be deployed on various mobile devices, such as tablets and phones, with internet access.

young girl playing a WLCP game on her phone
WLCP game creation visual

Technology


Learning in action, by Incorporating technology into hands-on educational activities, promoting technology supported games and hands-on activities, that guide and support students.

Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

Professional Development, Design Framework and more.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

View our latest publications, papers and more.

ABOUT US

THE WLCP TEAM

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PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS

Ivon Arroyo

Ivon Arroyo

Associate Professor
UMass Amherst

Erin Ottmar

Assistant Professor
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Gillian Smith

Associate Professor
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

STAFF

Matt Micciolo's picture

Matt Micciolo

Software Consultant
UMass Amherst

Francisco Castro's picture

Francisco Castro

Research Scientist
UMass Amherst

STUDENTS

Avery Harrison's picture

Avery Harrison

Ph.D. student
Advisors: Ivon Arroyo, Erin Ottmar
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Hannah Smith

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Grace Seiche

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Richard Valente

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Esther Agbaji

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Luisa Perez

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Olivia Bogs

Graduate Student
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Quick-jump to:

Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

PLAYING GAMES

GAME LIBRARY, INSTRUCTIONS AND MATERIAL

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Publicly Available WLCP Games


In addition to designing your own games, the WLCP hosts publicly available games for anyone to play. Right now, most of the games focus on math content that were designed to cover a range of K-12 Common Core Standards.

See below for details about each of the researcher, teacher, and student-created games that are ready to play in classrooms or other learning environments!

GAME LIBRARY

Let’s Shoppe

Grade 7 | Ratios & Proportions 7.RP

Let’s Shoppe is a scavenger hunt game which challenges teams of students to solve real-world percent problems given to them on their mobile device. After solving the problem, students must search the classroom to find the card with the correct answer. The first team to finish the game is the winner!

Instructions | Materials


What’s My Line?

Grade 8 | Expressions and Equations 8.EE

The goal of this game is to review the various parts of the slope-intercept form of an equation and to ensure that students can read and interpret an equation written in this form. Students work in teams to go around to different stations featuring line graphs and must match an equation to the graph.

Instructions | Materials


EstimateIT!

Grades 3-5 | Geometry 3.G, Measurement 4.MD

EstimateIT! is a cooperative and competitive math scavenger hunt played individually or in teams of up to three. Players are tasked with finding, identifying, and measuring geometric objects scattered around the room based on clues given to them on their mobile devices.

Instructions and Materials Coming Soon!


Running for Fractions

Grades 3-5 | Number and Operations: Fractions 3.NF, 4.NF, 5.NF

EstimateIT! is a cooperative and competitive math scavenger hunt played individually or in teams of up to three. Players are tasked with finding, identifying, and measuring geometric objects scattered around the room based on clues given to them on their mobile devices.

Instructions and Materials Coming Soon!


Integer Hopscotch

Grade 6-7 | The Number System 6.NS, 7.NS

Integer Hopscotch is a movement-based game designed for students to practice working with negative integers. A number line with color coded integers is laid out on the floor for each team of two students to use. Teams of students work together to solve word problems and the first team to finish all the problems wins.

Instructions and Materials Coming Soon!


Tangrams Race

Grades 3-5 | Geometry Shapes 3.G

Tangrams Race is a geometric relay race that brings movement, excitement and geometry into the classroom. Tangrams Race is played individually or in teams of up to three. On each player’s turn, he or she receives a description on their phone of a geometric object (Tangram piece) in a pile across the room. Finally the Tangrams pieces are collaboratively assembled into a picture.

Instructions and Materials Coming Soon!


Quick-jump to:

Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

DESIGN GAMES

TURN IDEAS INTO GAME DESIGNS

TRENDING:

Turn Ideas Into Games


A big part of creating multiplayer games is the process of designing them. The following are images of sketches that students created as part of that process, which involves brainstorming, planning, perspective taking, and thinking at various levels of detail.

(Click To Enlarge Image)

Students of a wide range of ages have thought and come up with great and creative ideas, and continued to the implementation stage, only with the following prompt:

"Today you are going to design a math game with your team. This game is for students one year younger than you, so try to put yourself in the shoes of one of those students.
We want you to:

1. Design a math game
2. Draw a representation of the game on the paper pads
3. Describe the game in some way

The game has to meet these criteria:

A game that kids can play in school as part of math class (it can be played in the classroom or outside in a playground/park or in the gym)The game has to teach (or allow students to practice) a particular math conceptThe game should have at most 9 players and if there are teams, at most 3 teamsWe want to get the students moving, so the game must be active; it should require physical movement by the studentsIdeally, the movement should be connected to the math in some wayThe game should involve mobile technology (cell phones)We want you to specify the game (show us how your game works) on these pads on paper, and we will ask you to explain how it works later
If time allows, prepare to give a 3 minute presentation of your game to the class!"

Quick-jump to:

Learn about the WLCP team.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

DEVELOP GAMES

BUILD YOUR GAMES WITH THE WLCP PLATFORM

TRENDING:

(Click To Enlarge Image)

Quick-jump to:

Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

TUTORIALS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE WLCP

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Quick-jump to:

Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

Tutorial Series

Introductory videos to help you get started

Game Player

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use the Game Player mode to play games in the WLCP.

Watch this video or download these written instructions to get an in-depth introduction to being a Game Player.


Game Manager

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use the Game Manager mode to set up games for others to play. You will learn to create and delete the game instances needed to be able to play a game in the WLCP.

Watch this video or download these written instructions to get an in-depth introduction to being a Game Manager.


Game Editor

The Game Editor mode allows you to design and program your own games in the WLCP. Check out our series below to learn more about how to be a Game Editor.

States and Transitions

In this tutorial, you will learn how a game is set up in the Game Editor and about the basic building blocks for a game: states and transitions. You will also see how a game in the editor translates to what the players see.

Watch this video or download these written instructions (link coming soon).


Making a Game

In this tutorial, you will learn how to create and save your own games from scratch.

Watch this video or download these written instructions (link coming soon).


Editing a Game

In this tutorial, you will learn how to edit a game including how to add, delete, and move states, transitions, and arrows. You will also learn about editing public games.

Watch this video or download these written instructions (link coming soon).


Teams, Players, and Scopes

In this tutorial, you will learn to program games for multiple players and teams. You will learn how to show different displays to different players within the same state as well as how to solve common problems that may arise.

Watch this video or download these written instructions (link coming soon).


Debugging a Game

In this tutorial, you will learn how to test your game. You will learn about what debugging means and how to run and debug your game to see whether it works.

Watch this video or download these written instructions (link coming soon).

Explore more:

Need help getting started? Look at our Quick Tips.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

Frequently Asked Questions

Check out some of our most frequently asked questions below.

Quick-jump to:

FAQs for

Game Manager

FAQs for

Game Player

FAQs for

Game Editor

FAQs for

Error Messages

Game Manager - FAQs

What is a game instance?

A game instance is a single occurrence of playing a game from start to finish. Each time you start a new game or replay a game, you are playing a new game instance. You can play through to the end of the game or pause while playing a game instance and come back to it at a later time. However, restarting a game or playing a new game requires a new game instance each time. Each game instance has a unique game pin to identify it.

What is a game pin?

The game pin is the unique identifier for a game instance. The game pin is created when the game instance is created and it is required by the player in order to join the game. Game pins ensure that players join the intended game instance, so it is important to have the correct game pin.

How can I create a game instance?

You can create a game instance by logging into the WLCP and selecting the Game Manager mode. Click the green “+” button at the bottom center of the screen, select a game from the dropdown menu that appears, and click start. Your game instance will appear at the end of the list of active game instances and will display the Game Pin necessary for players to enter the game.

How do I delete a game instance?

You can delete a game instance by logging into the WLCP and selecting the Game Manager mode. Click the red pencil button at the bottom center of the screen. X buttons will appear in the top left corner of each of the game instances. Click the X next to the game instance you wish to delete and press “OK” to confirm deletion. When you are done deleting game instances, click the red pencil button again to hide the X buttons. You should always delete each game instance after playing the game.

How many players can play on one game instance?

The number of players who can play on one game instance depends on how many players or teams the game is designed to support. To figure out how many people can join the game in each game instance, start a game instance, go to the Game Player mode, and join the game. It will ask you to pick a player using a dropdown menu with all of the possible players. Counting these options will tell you the number of players that a game instance will support. Additionally, the WLCP games library provides details about each of our publically available games, including the number of players supported by each instance. If more people want to play, you can always start multiple game instances to play simultaneously (see below).

What if I have more players than the game allows?

You can start more than one game instance at a time and run them simultaneously to accommodate more players. Remember that each game instance has a unique game pin so more than one instance means more than one game pin.

How do I restart a game?

Game instances can only be played once. To restart a game, you need to create a new game instance. Remember to delete the old game instance after you are done playing it.

Need more help?

Feel free to reach out to us here.

Game Player - FAQs

How do I join a game?

To play a game, you need the game pin for the game instance started by a Game Manager (see FAQs for Game Managers). Once you have the game pin, log into the WLCP and select Game Player. Enter the game pin for the instance you wish to join and click “Join”. Then select the player you wish to be and play the game!

What materials do I need to play a game?

To play a game, you need a phone, tablet, or other mobile device with stable internet connection. You also need a Game Manager (which could be yourself) to create the game instance before players log in. Some games require additional materials that are specific to the game. Check out the Playing Games section of this website to see some available games to play.

What is a game pin?

The game pin is the unique identifier for a game instance. The game pin is created when the game instance is created and it is required by the player in order to join the game. Game pins ensure that players join the intended game instance, so it is important to have the correct game pin.

Game Editor - FAQs

How do I create a game?

To create a new game, log into the WLCP and choose the Game Editor mode. On the builder, click the “New” button in the top left. Choose a game name (with no spaces, numbers, or special characters in the title), the number of teams that will be able to play, and the number of players per team. You can also edit the game’s visibility which is publicly viewable to all WLCP users as the default setting. Clicking “Create” will make an empty game with your specifications. From there, you can add states and transitions to create your game.

How do I open an existing game?

If you have already created a game, you can open it again by selecting the “Load” button in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode, selecting the game you wish to edit from the dropdown menu, and clicking “Load”. You can load your personal games and any of the public games, but you will only be able to edit the games that you have created. To edit someone else’s game, make your own copy of the game by going to “Game Options” in the top menu bar and selecting “Copy Game”.

Can other people edit my game?

No, only the person who created the game can edit it. To edit someone else’s game, make your own copy by going to “Game Options” in the top menu bar and selecting “Copy Game”.

Will my game save automatically?

No, your game will not save automatically. To save your game, click the save button in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode. When you leave the page, you will see a pop-up box reminding you to save your game.

What is a state?

A state is a game element that represents a screen that the players will see on their mobile devices. To create a state, you can drag a state from the toolbox on the left and drop it onto the builder. Attach the state to the rest of your game by dragging an arrow from the gray circle on the bottom of one state to the gray circle on the top of the state you just added to your builder. Double clicking the state will open the state editor where you can enter the state title (for editing purposes only) and the display text/image, which will be shown on the screen that the players see.

What is the start?

The start is a placeholder that defines where players will begin in your game. Drag an arrow from the gray circle on the bottom of the start to the top gray circle on the state representing the screen you want all players to see first. There should only ever be one arrow coming from the start and that is the only arrow in your game that should NOT have a transition on it.

What is a transition?

A transition is a game element that represents how the players will move from one state to the next. For instance, a player typing an answer and clicking submit to move on is an example of a transition. There are three possible transition types:

(1) Button Press
(2) Color Sequence or
(3) Text Entry

To make a transition, you can drag a transition from the toolbox on the left and drop it on an arrow that connects two states. Transitions can only be placed on arrows so always connect two states prior to making a transition. Double clicking the transition will open the transition editor where you can choose the transition type and enter the response that allows players to proceed from one state to the next.

How do I connect states? What are the arrows?

To connect states, you drag an arrow from the gray circle on the bottom of one state to the gray circle on the top of the state you want players to move to next. For instance, for players to move from State A to State B, you would drag an arrow from the bottom of State A to the top of State B. Each arrow should have a transition on it (except the arrow from the start). To remove an arrow, click and drag the gray circle that the arrowhead is attached to and drop the arrow on an empty part of the builder to delete it. If you pick up the wrong arrow, drop it back on the gray circle and try again; you will automatically pick up a different arrow.

How many connections can you have to and from a state?

There is no limit on the number of connections to and from a state, so make as many as you need for your game.

What is a Button Press transition?

A Button Press is a transition type where a player clicks one button or selects one answer option to move to the next screen. There are four color options: red, green, blue, and black. A player will see all four buttons on the bottom of their screen and they will choose one button to move to another screen.

What is a Button Press transition?

A Button Press is a transition type where a player clicks one button or selects one answer option to move to the next screen. There are four color options: red, green, blue, and black. A player will see all four buttons on the bottom of their screen and they will choose one button to move to another screen.

What is a Color Sequence transition?

A Color Sequence is a transition type where players enter the color squares in a specific sequence to move to the next screen. There are four colors that can be included in the sequence: red, green, blue, and black. Each of these colors may be used as many times as you desire. For example, a sequence may be blue-blue-blue-blue or red-green. A player will see four colored squares and an empty box at the bottom of their screen. They can drag the colored squares into the box and then hit the submit button to enter the color sequence.

What is a Text Entry transition?

A Text Entry is a transition type where a player types in an answer to move to the next screen. A player will see an empty white box, which they can type their response into, and a “Submit” button at the bottom of their screen to process their response.

How do I choose the type of transition I want?

All transition types are available within the transition that you can grab from the toolbox. Once your transition is on your diagram, you can double click it to open the transition editor. Then you can select your transition type in the column on the left.

How do I add what transition inputs (buttons, color sequences, or text entries) will be accepted in a transition?

You indicate the accepted transition input in the section on the right of the transition editor. For a Button Press transition, you check off which buttons would be accepted by the transition. For Color Sequences and Text Entries, you click the “Add Sequence” or “Add Text Entry” buttons and enter an accepted input in the box that pops up.

What if I want to indicate all the possible wrong or other answers in a transition?

For a Button Press transition, you can check off all the colors that are not checked off in other transitions with the same source states. For a Color Sequence or Text Entry transition, an empty input will indicate all inputs that are unassigned in all the transitions with the same source state. For example, if State A has a connection to State B and to State C and the transition on the arrow from State A to State B only accepts 7 as an input, then adding an empty transition on the arrow from State A to State C would accept any input that is not 7. To add an empty input, click the “Add” button in the Transition Editor and then click the “Accept” button on the pop up window without filling anything in.

What do the “Game Wide”, “Team 1”, etc. buttons at the top of a state or transition dialogue box mean?

The top row of buttons on a state or transition dialogue box always has a series of buttons labeled “Game Wide”, “Team 1”, etc. These buttons represent the scope and they function much like tabs. When “Game Wide” is selected, whatever you enter for the state or transition will be shown to all players in the game. Alternatively, you could select more specific groups, like Team 1 or Team 1 Player 1.

When you select a specific player or team, whatever you enter for that state or transition will only be shown to that specific team or player. Remember that if you change the scope to team level, you need to fill out the state or transition for each team.

The same applies when changing the scope to player level. When you start entering text or answers in the state editor, some of the scopes may disappear to ensure that you do not assign the same users to see two different things. If you do not see the scope you are looking for, it is already assigned; try clearing out the information you inputted or deleting and recreating the state or transition.

Can I make transitions that refer back to an older state (rather than strictly going from top to bottom in the builder)?

Yes! We recommend filling in your diagram from top to bottom as you add game elements to avoid certain errors, but you can always add more later or connect a state to a previous state that is higher up in your diagram.

What is the debugger?

The debugger is a feature of the WLCP that allows Game Editors to test their game. It simulates what a Game Player sees on their mobile device screen when playing the game so you can make sure that your game behaves as expected or fix any problems before letting others play your game.

How do I use the debugger?

To launch the debugger, click the “Run and Debug” button at the top of the screen. It will open a new tab with the debugger where you can select the player you want to be and then play the simulation of your game. When restarting the debugger, you will be given the option to open a new instance or open the existing instance (for if you want to debug as multiple players simultaneously). It is recommended that you debug your game periodically while creating it to catch errors early.

How do I copy my game?

Once the game you want to copy is open, you can copy it by clicking “Game Options” in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode. The menu that expands will have an option to copy a game. From there you can name your copy and create it. Remember to choose a name without numbers, special characters, or spaces.

How do I rename my game?

You can rename a game by clicking “Game Options” in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode. The menu that expands will have an option to rename a game. From there you can enter the new name for your game. Remember to choose a name without numbers, special characters, or spaces.You can rename a game by clicking “Game Options” in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode. The menu that expands will have an option to rename a game. From there you can enter the new name for your game. Remember to choose a name without numbers, special characters, or spaces.

How do I delete my game?

You can delete a game by clicking the “Game Options” in the top menu bar of the Game Editor mode. The menu that expands will have an option to delete a game.

Can I change the number of teams or players in my game?

You can not change the number of teams or players for a game after creating it. Instead, we suggest creating a new game if you want to change the number of teams or players.

Need more help?

Feel free to reach out to us here.

Error Messages - FAQs

“By clicking OK, the validation engine will revalidate causing possible data loss in states and transitions below!”

This is a common message that you will see warning you about problems that could occur when saving changes to a state or transition. Some changes to a state or transition that has states and transitions attached below it could invalidate some of the data in the lower states or transitions. This may cause them to be wiped by the system. This is mostly only a concern when editing the scopes, deleting a state or transition, or deleting all content in a state or transition and saving it empty. Nonetheless, it is suggested that you build and fill in your game from top to bottom to avoid these concerns.

“That sequence/Keyboard Input already exists in this scope (possibly in another neighbor transition)”

There can be no duplicate sequences or Keyboard Inputs that have the same source state. When a player is in a source state, their input to the transition determines which state they will proceed to. If one input is found in two transitions from the same state, then the system cannot determine which of the two transitions the player should go to. If you see this error, try examining the sequences or Keyboard Inputs in all the transitions that share the source state with the transition that gave you the error to find where this input has already been used.

“You cannot have any output connections without input connections”

Games are meant to be built top-down starting with the start. You cannot build disconnected sections of states and transitions and then try to combine them later. If you are seeing this error, you are probably trying to connect two states that do not have any connection to the start. Make sure that each state you add to the builder is first connected to a state with a path to the start.

“You cannot have multiple connections with same source and target state”

Connections (also known as arrows) are all unique in that they go from one source state to one target state and no two connections have the same source and the same target. If you are trying to duplicate a connection, try instead to modify the scopes (Game Wide, Team 1, etc) in the transition on the existing connection and make sure you fill out all available scopes.

“Drop a connection of the state before using it!”

You cannot open (double click) a state before connecting it to the rest of your game. Drag a connection from an existing state connected to the game to the new state you want to edit and then try opening the state again.

“All of the input states are empty. Fill in at least one the input state to edit this one”

A state can have multiple input connections (arrows to the top of the state) that come from source states. However, in order to edit a state, at least one of the source states must be filled in. In order to avoid this error, follow the guide of creating and filling in your game from top to bottom.

“All players and teams have been assigned in neighbor states”

This error is usually an indication that the transitions leading into the state have not been set up properly. Make sure that the transitions above have been filled out before trying to edit the states.

“A transition could not be placed there”

Transitions can only be placed on the arrow connections between states. You cannot put a transition on the builder unless it is on an arrow connection.

Need more help?

Feel free to reach out to us here.

Explore more:

Need help getting started? Look at our Quick Tips.

Get in touch with us.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

Design Patterns

TRENDING:

In the WLCP, a common question is how to lay out the game elements in the builder, so we have come up with some design patterns to help you out. The formal computer science definition of a design pattern is a reusable solution to a common problem. These design patterns are ideas to serve as a building off point for your game, but there are infinite ways to design your game in the WLCP Game Editor.

The most basic design pattern is a simple linear layout as shown below. A linear layout is just a series of questions back to back. Each player reads one question, responds to that one question, and then sees the next question. There is relatively no feedback or support with this model. However, it serves as the foundation for other patterns.

A linear design pattern with the display text labeled for convenience. Click visual to enlarge.

When playing a game, feedback can be very helpful for players. In the linear pattern, you could indicate that a player’s last response was correct at the start of the next question. However, there is not a way to indicate that a player entered an incorrect response. One way to do that is in the pattern below.

A linear design pattern with an incorrect state that leads back to the original question. Click visual to enlarge.

This brings up another question: Where should players go after answering a question incorrectly?

The pattern above shows that when a player enters an incorrect answer, they are notified and then brought back to the question to try again. Another option would be to instead bring the player to the next question or another question entirely. This only gives the players one chance to answer a question correctly. More patterns with incorrect response feedback are shown below.

A linear pattern with an incorrect state that leads to the next question. Click visual to enlarge.

A linear pattern that leads to another question. Click visual to enlarge.

Now we’ve talked about how to give feedback about an incorrect response, but positive feedback for a correct response can also be helpful. As mentioned previously, in the linear pattern you can have positive feedback at the beginning of the next question. Yet you may want to make that positive response more clear by making it a separate state. Below are some examples of how to incorporate a correct response state into your question layout.

Patterns with correct and incorrect states where the incorrect state can lead to the original question (top left), the next question (top right), or an entirely new question (bottom). Click visual to enlarge.

A final area to consider is support, which is usually provided through hints. If you decide to incorporate hints into your game, you must decide when and how players can access hints. There are two popular ways to give hints to players. The first is by allowing players to access hints directly from the question with a specified response (i.e. “Press the black button for a hint”). Another option is to give players a hint automatically after they answer the question incorrectly. Both patterns are shown below.

A linear pattern with an incorrect state that leads to the next question. Click visual to enlarge.

A linear pattern that leads to another question. Click visual to enlarge.

One last piece to consider is organization. Even the best design pattern can become a mess if your game elements are not well organized on the page. An example of poor organization is shown below.

When designing your game, spacing and position of states can make a huge difference. We recommend spacing states out evenly and positioning them so that arrows overlap as little as possible. Pick a direction to build your game, either top to bottom or left to right, and stick with it, so it is easy to anticipate where the next question will go. Finally, be as consistent as possible. If the correct state is on the left and the incorrect state is on the right, keep it that way for the entire design.

There are many different ways to mix and match the concepts of these design patterns to create a layout that works for your game. You may choose to combine state or create a new pattern all together. However, it is important to think about your layout before you begin programming your game in the WLCP Game Editor in order to avoid making large structural changes later in the programming process. Below are a list of questions to help you choose the design pattern you want to use or create for your game.

Design Pattern Questions To Consider:

Do you want to provide feedback if the player enters the correct response?Do you want to provide feedback if the player enters an incorrect response?Where do you want a player to go after being notified they entered an incorrect response? Back to the original question? To a new question?Do you want to provide hints for players?Where do you want a player to access a hint? From the question? From the incorrect state?How would you like players to access the hint? Automatically? By requesting a hint?

Need more help?

Feel free to reach out to us here.

MORE FROM WLCP:

Need help getting started? Look at our Quick Tips.

Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

Vocab Sheet

TRENDING:

Arrow

An arrow is another name for a connection (see below) used between states and transitions.

Builder

The builder is the large white section of the Game Editor where users can form their games.

Connection

A connection is a game element that draws a line linking a source state to a target state. Connections can also be referred to as arrows. All transitions must be placed on connections.

Game Element

A game element is a specific component of a game. There are four types of game elements: start, states, connections, and transitions.

Game Instance

Game Instance - a single occurrence of playing a game. Game instances can be started and ended by the Game Manager. Each game instance has a game pin to identify it.

Game Pin

A game pin is a unique identifier for a specific game instance. Game Players must enter a game pin in order to play a game. The Game Manager, who starts each game instance, must provide players with the game pin to get started.

Scope

The scope is the subset of players to which the content in a state or transition applies. The scope can be game wide, broken down into teams, or even broken down into individual players. As the Game Editor, setting the scope in a state or transition allows you to assign different content to different teams and players without having to create additional states and transitions.

Source State

A source state is a state from which an arrow or connection originates. Each connection is drawn from the bottom of a source state. The opposite of a source state is a target state.

Game Instance

Game Instance - a single occurrence of playing a game. Game instances can be started and ended by the Game Manager. Each game instance has a game pin to identify it.

Game Pin

A game pin is a unique identifier for a specific game instance. Game Players must enter a game pin in order to play a game. The Game Manager, who starts each game instance, must provide players with the game pin to get started.

Scope

The scope is the subset of players to which the content in a state or transition applies. The scope can be game wide, broken down into teams, or even broken down into individual players. As the Game Editor, setting the scope in a state or transition allows you to assign different content to different teams and players without having to create additional states and transitions.

Source State

A source state is a state from which an arrow or connection originates. Each connection is drawn from the bottom of a source state. The opposite of a source state is a target state.

Start

The start is a game element that defines where players will begin in a game. The start will have only one connection coming from it and that connection will point to the state that all players will see when they begin playing the game.

State

A state is a game element that represents the static content on a screen that will be viewed by players during the game. Each state can contain text and/or images. Game editors also have the option to customize a state’s content for each game player.

State Editor

The state editor is the pop up box that allows Game Editors to enter content and set the scopes of a state. Users can open the state editor by double clicking on a state from the builder.

Target State

A target state is a state where an arrow or connection terminates. Each connection is drawn to the top of a target state. The opposite of a target state is a start state.

Toolbox

The toolbox is the left panel of the Game Editor where game elements are stored. Users can drag states and transitions from the toolbox onto the builder to add elements to their games.

Top Menu

The top menu is the bar at the top of the Game Editor where options such as “New”, “Load”, “Save”, “Home”, and “Log Out” are located.

Transition

A transition is a game element that represents the way players interact with the game and move from screen to screen. A transition will appear at the bottom of a game screen and what the player enters determines the next state they will see. There are three different types of transitions: Button Press, Color Sequence, and Text Entry.

Transition Editor

The transition editor is a pop up box that allows Game Editors to enter inputs and set the scopes of a transition. Users can open the transition editor by double clicking on a transition from the builder.

WLCP

WLCP - The Wearable Learning Cloud Platform (WLCP) is a free online tool that facilitates the play and creation of embodied mobile games.

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View our latest publications, papers and more.

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Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

Quick Tips

As a Game Player, be sure you know who your Game Manager is and ask them questions if you get stuck while logging in or playing a game.If you create a game instance in the WLCP Game Manager, make sure you delete it when you are finished playing it. Remember, you can always start new game instances as the Game Manager.When designing a game, try drawing it out on paper and writing all of your content (game instructions, questions and answers, etc) before building your game in the WLCP Game Editor.When building a game, fill in the states and transitions as you add them to the builder. We do not recommend adding all the game elements at once to see the structure and then going back to fill in all the game elements after.Organization is important. As you add elements to your game, your builder can easily get messy and become unreadable. Pick a direction to build your game, either top to bottom or left to right. Position your game elements carefully on the builder so that arrows overlap as little as possible.In the Game Editor, test your game early and often using the debugger. You can use the debugger to simulate playing your game and to find any bugs that may prevent the game from working properly.Check out all of our tutorial resources to learn about how to use the WLCP.

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View our latest publications, papers and more.

Professional Development, Design Framework and more.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

FOR RESEARCHERS

STUDIES, PAPERS AND NEWS

TRENDING:

PUBLISHED


Smith, H., Harrison, A., Ottmar, E., Arroyo, I. Supporting Technology-Augmented Game Creation and Play Through A Teacher Professional Development Program. In proceedings of the 2019 Northeastern Educational Research Association Conference


Harrison, A., Hulse, T., Manzo, D., Micciolo, M., Ottmar, E., & Arroyo, I. (June, 2018). Computational thinking through game creation in STEM classrooms. Proceedings (Part II) of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education. London, U.K. pp. 134-138.


Micciolo, M., Arroyo, I., Harrison, A., & Hulse, T. (June, 2018). The wearable learning cloud platform for the creation of embodied multiplayer math games. Proceedings (Part II) of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education. London, U.K. pp. 220-224. (Poster)


Ottmar, E., Melcer, E., Abrahamson, D., Nathan, M., Fyfe, E., & Smith, C. (2018). Embodied Mathematical Imagination and Cognition (EMIC) working group. Working group presented at the 2018 conference of the North American Chapter of the Psychology of Mathematics Education.


Hulse, T., Harrison, A., Arroyo, I., Ottmar, E. Developing Methods to Implement Embodied Game Design for Mobile Learning Technologies in STEM Classrooms (November, 2018). Poster presented at the 2018 conference of the North American Chapter of the Psychology of Mathematics Education.


Arroyo, I., Micciollo, M., Casano, J., Ottmar, E., Hulse, T., and Mercedes Rodrigo, M. (2017). Wearable Learning: Multiplayer Embodied Games for Math. In Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 205-216. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3116595.3116637


MORE FROM WLCP:

Professional Development, Design Framework and more.

Have a specific question or want to refresh your skills? Check out our FAQs section.

Send us a message and we will get back to you.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

FOR TEACHERS

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE GAME PLAY AND DESIGN FRAMEWORK

TRENDING:

Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and The University of Massachusetts Amherst have designed a 7-14 week curriculum for teachers to follow with their students. The curriculum follows our Game Play and Design Framework which is illustrated below.


The Game Play and Design Framework


Teachers and students will have opportunities to both create and play games throughout this curriculum. The total 14-week curriculum involves teachers creating games for their classroom designed around their current curriculum and their students’ needs.

Teachers then play these games with their students to practice content knowledge and introduce students to the Wearable Learning Cloud Platform (WLCP) and afterwards lead their students in the game creation process.

Teachers can sharpen their content knowledge and computational thinking skills through creating games that focus on specific topics to teach or review with students! Students increase their math skills through playing games and develop important computational thinking skills through the game creation process.


Teachers can sharpen their content knowledge and computational thinking skills through creating games that focus on specific topics to teach or review with students! Students increase their math skills through playing games and develop important computational thinking skills through the game creation process.

Below are the links to the complete curriculum as well as the different aspects of the curriculum for you to choose from.

Full curriculum and materials

Teachers creating games for their classroom

Students playing previously created games

If you have any questions or want more information, feel free to contact us here.

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Take a look at our Tutorial Series for introductory videos to help you get started.

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Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.

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ASK US ANYTHING

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Learn about the WLCP team.

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Check out our Design Patterns for cool ideas.

Check out our Vocab Sheet for the key terms used in WLCP.